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Minnie Howell: 1900-1901

The Shepherd's Crook

Shepherd's Crook, with ribbons for the graduating classes of 1898 through 1910. "The tradition of the shepherd's crook dates back to 1898, when the first senior class colors were attached to the first crook and passed to the junior class. The crook, chosen as a symbol of the senior shepherd caring for the underclass sheep, meant different things to different classes--a good fight, a stealthy spriting of the disguised article, a carefully contrived effort to steal it, a desperate foot race to a symbol treated with great reverence, to be received majestically and bequeathed with dignity at the proper time. this tradition lasted 40 years, from 1898 to 1938.

"The crook was the property of the senior class. Each spring, close to commencement, the seniors and juniors gathered and in the course of the program the senior president, with suitable solemnity, would 'pass' the crook to the president of the juniors. The crook bore the class colors of the retiring owners and the preceding classes (circa 1898 and after), and the juniors were instructed to place their colors on the crook before entrusting its care a year hence. If a class refused the crook, or if a class could not receive it because it had been stolen, black crepe ribbons with the missing years were attached. In its 40-year history, the crook was refused by some classes, and stolen several times by the sophomore classes, who then returned it to the senior class from which it had been stolen, or kept it hidden until the sophomores themselves were seniors."

From Commencement Program, Dec 8 & 9, 1995.



Events from 1900-1901

  • Stray seniors were nabbed by the juniors and carried to the hydrant and given a free head wash amid much laughter and cheering. President Nichols informed the crowd that "there is danger of washing all knowledge out of the seniors' heads, and the fun had better stop. Since then, things have been rather dry, unless tying juniors down in the dewy grass of a night can be reckoned wet." (From the Students' Herald, 14 Jun 1900, page 314)

  • Library contains 23,000 bound volumes, 18,000 pamphlets, and 2,500 government documents.

Course of Study, 1900-1901
Reflecting information from Minnie Howell's transcript

 
Class
Hours/Week  
Fall Term
14 weeks
Physics
5
Hist. of Industries
5
Bacteriology & Lab.
6.5
Therapeutic Cookery & Lab.  
4.5
Science II
5
 
Winter Term
12 weeks
Physics II
5
Logic
5
Home Architecture
2.5
Dressmaking
5
Printing
2.5
 
Spring Term
11 weeks
Eng. Literature
5
Psychology
5
Economics
5
Demonstrations
5
Freehand Drawing
2.5
Dressmaking
 
 
[When no work outside of class required, italics are used.]


Domestic Science: Therapeutic Cookery

This work comprises special cookery for the sick, and mutual relations of foods and medicines; the chemistry of digestion and assimilation; the various ways of administering food to the sick and convalescent, and precautions in the general care of the sick.

From the General Catalog, 1900-1901, p.48.



Domestic Science: Demonstrations

Lecture work in scientific and practical cookery. Each student is required to give a demonstration lecture in cooking before the class, and give approved recipes, observing all the educational, scientific, technical and practical points involved in each method demonstrated. The student lecturer may select one assistant from the class, to assist in the general details of the work. In connection with this lecture work, each student is required to give a complete lesson outline and conduct one class in practical work according to the best approved methods in laboratory practice.

From the General Catalog, 1900-1901, p.49.



Dressmaking

Students in Advanced Dressmaking class. The use of a dress-cutting system is taught, and each pupil will be required to draft, cut and make a woolen dress for herself.

Ten hours per week are devoted to class work and about three hours' home work is required per week.

From the General Catalog, 1900-1901, p.50.



Home Architecture

This study is taught by lectures covering the following topics: Location of the home; landscape surroundings; roads, walks, fences, and outbuildings; the individuality of the home; building materials; the historic development of the dwelling-house; foundations and basement; the arrangement of the main-floor rooms; the roof and attic; heating and ventilation; water-supply; water-closets, cesspools, and other drainage problems; paint and varnish; interior decoration; the school-house. Each student is required to design a set of plans, elevations and details of a residence, with modern provisions for heating, ventilation, and drainage.

From the General Catalog, 1900-1901, p.51.



Printing

printing classThe printing department, in the main building, occupies six large rooms, viz.: Superintendent's office, composing-room, pressroom, folding room or bindery, stock-room, and storeroom, all well lighted, amply ventilated, and heated by steam.

The lessons embraced may be briefly summarized under these suggestive topics: The elements of news, book and job composition and imposition; proof-reading and correcting; plain and color presswork; adaptation of various grades of inks and papers; newspaper and magazine folding; mailing; tableting of stationery, and pamphlet stitching and stapling. The instruction is of that character in which individual advancement is always taken into account, and opportunity is extended for individual growth in the knowledge of those principles which are of practical utility in the every-day work of a printing-office. Occasion for the gaining of experience and acquirement of skill is supplied by the weekly publication of the Industrialist and the Students' Herald, the execution of the wide range of job printing needed to furnish the various College departments with blanks, lesson outlines, and stationery, and the College societies with programs, notices, etc.; thus furnishing a greater range of work for instruction than is ordinarily found in the average printing office.

From the General Catalog, 1900-1901, p.69.



Bacteriology

This course consists of a brief history of the development of bacteriology as a science; morphology and physiology of bacteria; the relation of external conditions to bacterial development; disinfection; bacteriological technique, description of apparatus used, preparation for culture media, cultivation and staining of bacteria; the role of bacteria in nature in relation to digestion, preservation of foods, nitrification, infection, etc. The students are required to do laboratory work, in which they study the cultural features and staining of bacteria. Lectures and laboratory work.

From the General Catalog, 1900-1901, p.69.



Logic

The art of reasoning correctly is aided by a study of systematic logic, both deductive and inductive. Special prominence is given to methods for exact observation and experiment and correct principles of classification. The previous researches and experience of the students are made to illustrate these principles.

From the General Catalog, 1900-1901, p.71.



Psychology

A short course in psychology gives the general principles of intellectual and moral philosophy. Sensation, apperception, perception, memory, imagination, thought, feeling and volition are topics of explanation and analysis. Theories of right and wrong and correct principles of action are made the means of a clear understanding of individual responsibility, with special attention to personal rights and duties. Topics are assigned for research, to be presented in thesis form at the close of the term.

From the General Catalog, 1900-1901, p.71.



Commencement Week Invitation and Schedule, 1901
Commencement Week Invitation, 1901 Commencement Week Schedule, 1901


Commencement Program, 1901 Class Roll and Theses, 1901
Commencement program,1901 Class Roll and Theses,1901




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